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We have taken numerous trips to Maine and Nova Scotia
over the years. Here are a few pictures of lighthouses.


Cape Fichu Lighthouse, Yarmouth, NS
Bay of Fundy.

Lighthouse known as "The Old Yarmouth Light."
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Since 1839, ships entering and leaving Yarmouth Harbour on a passage across the Gulf of Maine, a fishing trip, or, in earlier times, a voyage to distant lands aboard a square rigger, have passed the light tower at Cape Forchu. For decades, the day mark has been a red lantern and alternating red and white faces on the octagonal tower. The original timber tower was lit on 15th January, 1840. The lens was a classic Fresnel, a circular central lens surrounded by concentric rings of glass which concentrated the light of the lamp into one powerful beam which shot out into the night. The Cape Forchu example had eight faces, each of which produced a white flash. It was turned by a clockwork mechanism which had to be wound every three hours. (This original lens, which was manufactured in France, can now be viewed in the Yarmouth County Museum, Yarmouth.) The first lighting apparatus was a kerosene lamp. This was later replaced by a pressurized vapour lamp, and finally by electricity generated on the station. The early lamps had to be watched carefully, for they could easily go out. One keeper estimated that during his 31 years on duty he climbed the tower at least 47,000 times!

Fort Point Lighthouse, Liverpool, NS
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Liverpool, Nova Scotia boasts a uniquely shaped light, one of the oldest in Nova Scotia, commanding a historic site close to the middle of town. Named after the fortified gun battery that protected the town from the 1760s to the 1860s, the point saw several actions in the American Revolution. It was also a signal station and an important public gathering place for the town, becoming park in the late1800s.

Visible from the park is Coffin Island, where the Liverpool area received its first light in 1815 to help mariners along the coast and locate the entrance to Liverpool Bay. By the 1850s, the booming timber trade brought pressure to make Liverpool's harbour easier and safer to enter by day or night. A petition in 1855 from "merchants, shipmasters and other inhabitants of Queens County" persuaded the Nova Scotia legislature to build a harbour light for Liverpool.

While built of wood, its survival on an exposed point for almost a century and a half is testimony to wise construction and the dedicated maintenance of keepers and their families. Most harbour lights follow the same simple pattern, often called "pepper-pot" lights. However Fort Point, dating from an earlier era has a uniquely shaped gable roof described in geometric language by a 1872 sailing guide as "the frustrum of a pyramid on a square base".

In the years that followed, when ships loading timber tied up three deep at Liverpool wharves, the light proved indispensable in making the crowded and busy harbour safe. A review of Nova Scotia lights in 1870 described Fort Point as "of the greatest importance to the trade of the port". It was eventually joined by a network of buoys and markers in the harbour and even a small light on the bridge in the middle of town.

 


Fort Point Lighthouse, Liverpool, NS

Carter Island Lighthouse, Lockport, NS
Built in 1872, the lighthouse is only accusable by boat.

Portland Head, Portland, Maine. Built in 1790.
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John Hancock first authorized construction of this 80-foot light in 1784. Delayed by insufficient funds, construction didnít begin until 1790. On January 10, 1791 , George Washington appointed its first keeper. Portland Head was Maine ís first lighthouse and marks the stateís busiest harbor, boasting historic significance and beauty, which make it possibly the most visited lighthouse in America . Worthy of note, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the celebrated American poet, found the peaceful beauty of the lighthouse well suited to writing poetry, choosing to write here often.

Portland Head, Portland, Maine

Portland Head, Portland, Maine

Cape Elizabeth West Light, Cape Elizabeth, Maine
Near Portland, Maine
Part of Two Lights State Park

Cape Elizabeth West Light, Cape Elizabeth, Maine
Near Portland, Maine
Part of Two Lights State Park

Cape Elizabeth East Light, Cape Elizabeth, Maine
Near Portland, Maine
Part of Two Lights State Park

Cape Neddick (Nubbles) Light
York Beach, Maine
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Cape Neddick Light lies near the town of York, Maine.  Cape Neddick Lighthouse is casually referred to as "The Nubble."  The lighthouse was established and first lit in 1879.  The cast iron and brick tower stands 41 feet tall and holds a fourth order fresnel lens.  The wood lighthouse keeper's house stands in its Victorian Style.  The light and keepers quarters are located on a small island around 100 feet from the main land.  In order to gain access to the island, people and supplies are hoisted in a bucket on a line across the channel.  This view looks up to the lighthouse and the keeper's house on the little rocky island.

Cape Neddick (Nubbles) Light
York Beach, Maine

Ram Island Light, Booth Bay, Maine

Ram Island Light, Booth Bay, Maine

Burnt Island Light, Booth Bay, Maine